The following is a list of links to manuals relating to Shaula.

Jeffery's No.2, Black Marine Glue

This traditional product has been the premier choice for deck seaming for decades. Its fine pouring qualities allow it to be used for the smallest seams and once cured it adheres tenaciously to the seam, will not crack and remains flexible for many years.

Instructions for Melting and Applying

The glue is available in 12.5 kg packs and 25 kg tins.

Break the glue into small pieces and put in a clean melting pot to three-quarters full, and place over heat source. Melt glue slowly, giving occasionally stirring until it flows freely, which will be about 200'C Care must be taken during the melting process, as prolonged overheating will damage certain qualities of the glue. The caulking must be hammered well down into the seams, which must be free from dust, grease, etc. which may prevent adhesion. Due to the expansion and contraction of timber and confirmed by practical experience we would suggest the following seam dimensions as being the minimum necessary to give a trouble free and waterproof deck.

Timber
Width of planks
Width of seams
Depth of seams
Teak
50mm
2.4mm
9.6mm
Teak 75mm
6.5mm
12.5mm
Softwoods
50mm
2.4mm
9.6mm
Softwoods
75mm
6.5mm
12.5mm

Two applications of glue should be made the first coming level with the top of the seam. The first application will release a mass of bubbles of steam and air into the seam,which will rise to the top of the glue but will not all be released owing to the chilling of the surface. The second application will then reheat the top of the glue, allowing the bubbles to float out into the bead, which will later be scraped off and discarded.

Removing scaffolding leg system from Shaula

Instructions from Dominic

Strip out the horizontal poles that join the front to back legs. Take off the back legs leaving just the forward set of legs. Undo and remove the braces that connect the forward legs to the bilge keels. When the boat floats all there is left to do is undo the fitting on the chain plate and lift the legs up on to the deck. Alternatively to lifting the legs on to the deck the fitting can be loosened and the leg pulled up out of the water, fasten the fitting and leave the leg on the side of the boat. She will stand on two legs no problem, the stern ones were just for extra security. She will also stand up VERTICALLY with no effort. It is only once she starts to lean over that there is a problem. No legs will stop her once the angle of lean is more than a few degrees. All the legs do is keep her standing to within a degree or two of VERTICAL. A wall, quay or something that can support the weight is the only thing that will hold her up past a few degrees of VERTICAL. The greater the angle=the greater the weight. Good luck, don't worry, once she is floating she can't fall over!!!! Another option is to chock her up under the bilge keels with blocks of wood and wedges from the yard. Then you can take the legs off completely prior to floating. Obviously the blocks will float out once she floats off of them. I have tethered them all off before so that I can retrieve them. I have used this method of supporting her when I have been painting the hull.

Wire gauge conversion chart

Wire Gauge / Connector Colour Table
AWG SWG mm Connector Colour
4/0 - 11.7 ?
- 5/0 11.0 ?
3/0 - 10.4 ?
- 4/0 10.1 ?
- 3/0 9.4 ?
2/0 - 9.3 ?
- 2/0 8.8 ?
0 - 8.3 ?
- 0 8.2 ?
- 1 7.6 ?
1 - 7.3 ?
- 2 7.0 ?
2 - 6.6 ?
- 3 6.4 ?
- 4 5.9 ?
3 - 5.8 ?
- 5 5.4 ?
4 - 5.2 ?
5 - 4.6 ?
6 - 4.1 ?
7 - 3.7 ?
- 9 3.7 ?
8 - 3.3 ?
- 10 3.3 ?
- 11 2.9 ?
9 - 2.9 ?
- 12 2.6 ?
10 - 2.6 Yellow
- 13 2.3 Yellow
11 - 2.3 Yellow
12 - 2.1 Yellow
- 14 2.0 ?
13 - 1.8 ?
- 15 1.8 ?
14 - 1.6 Blue
- 16 1.6 Blue
15 - 1.5 Blue
- 17 1.4 Blue
16 - 1.3 Blue / Red
- 18 1.2 Red